June 21, 2024

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NOAA completes historic missions into Hurricane Ian – Hurricane Research Division

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Despite the late start to the 2022 Atlantic Hurricane season, NOAA Hurricane Hunters have been very busy flying operational and research missions into and around Hurricanes Earl, Fiona, and Ian during the last few weeks.

The crew of NOAA42 before a flight. Credit: Holly Stahl NOAA/AOML
HRD scientist Kathryn Sellwood analyzing dropsonde data during the mission into Tropical Storm Fiona on September 17th. Dropwindsondes are released from the aircraft and transmit pressure, temperature, humidity, and moisture readings back to the aircraft 4 times per second as they fall to the ocean surface. Scientists like Kathryn quality control the data to send to Hurricane Specialists at the National Hurricane Center and to be added into forecast models. Credit: Holly Stahl, NOAA/AOML

HRD scientisst Rob Rogers and Trey Alvey talk about their upcoming mission. Listen in here and here.

HRD scientists Rob Rogers and Trey Alvey analyzing Tail Doppler Radar data during the mission into Tropical Storm Fiona on September 17th. The Doppler radar data are quality-controlled and analyzed onboard the aircraft and sent to Hurricane Specialists at the National Hurricane Center and into forecast models. Credit: Holly Stahl, NOAA/AOML
HRD scientists Heather Holbach and Shirley Murillo, and CIMAS Research Associate Samantha Camposano in front of NOAA 43 before one of their missions into a hurricane. Credit: Shirley Murillo NOAA/AOML
The crew of NOAA43 during a pre-flight brief before flying into Hurricane Fiona. Credit: Heather Holbach NOAA/AOML
A rainbow visible off the wing on the way to Hurricane Fiona. Credit: Heather Holbach: NOAA/AOML
The eye of Hurricane Fiona as seen on the P-3’s belly radar (top) and nose radar (bottom). Credit: Heather Holbach NOAA/AOML
HRD scientists Heather Holbach and Jason Sippel, and CIMAS Research Associate Samantha Camposano looking at data in Hurricane Fiona. Credit: Shirley Murillo NOAA/AOML
The ocean surface as seen from NOAA43 in Hurricane Fiona. The waves on the ocean surface can tell us a lot about how strong the winds are. Credit: Heather Holbach NOAA/AOML
HRD scientists Andy Hazelton and Heather Holbach before their final flight into Hurricane Ian. Credit: Heather Holbach NOAA/AOML
Inside the eye of Hurricane Ian. Credit: Heather Holbach NOAA/AOML
Radar image and flight track of NOAA”s last penetration into the eye of Hurricane Ian before landfall. Credit: Frank Marks NOAA/AOML

For more information, contact aoml.communications@noaa.gov.

noaahrd

2022-09-29 19:26:36

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