10 cozy recipes for sweater weather, the season and the state of mind

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The sweater.

When pulled on, an immediate sense of warmth and softness, a cozy, wearable blanket. When made especially for you by magnificent wielders of knitting needles, a nostalgic and sentimental rush of knowing you are loved by somebody with some serious skills.

Sweater weather, as it has been dubbed (and ruined by this song, and mocked by “Saturday Night Live”), marks all these things as much as it does the changing of our food habit to soothe seasonal colds and moods as well as abate the chilling of fingertips and noses.

We’ve pulled our best recipes for sweater season. Get ready to get cozy.

Tim’s Macaroni and Cheese, above. Can you talk about comforting without mac and cheese? Maybe you can, but we can’t. This version has a whole lot of cheese, plus a smoky backbone of roasted Anaheim peppers for a slight kick. There are also 10 (ten!) cloves of garlic, which don’t end up tasting like too much. If you can’t find Anaheims, feel free to substitute poblanos. If you’re craving mac and cheese but have gone meatless, this Green Chile Mac will do the trick.



(Tom McCorkle for The Washington Post; food styling by Bonnie S. Benwick/The Washington Post)

Creamy Tomato Soup With Popcorn. Classic tomato soup gets a slightly lighter — and fresher — twist here. With all the creamy textures you love but less sugar and salt, you can sip as much as you want. A handful of fresh popcorn on top makes for a fun textural addition you’ve probably never thought of and will absolutely repeat.



(Tom McCorkle for The Washington Post; food styling by Lisa Cherkasky for The Washington Post)

New-Style Polish Hunter’s Stew (Bigos Revisited). Bigos is a hearty, meaty Polish soup that should be on your fall/winter recipe roster. This version, via the hit show “Queer Eye’s” cooking expert, Antoni Porowski, adds a splash of red wine for a little French twist.



(Stacy Zarin Goldberg for The Washington Post; food styling by Lisa Cherkasky for The Washington Post)

Not-Quite Matzoh Ball Soup. No, it’s not quite matzoh ball soup, but it is gluten-free and deliciously similar to the classic.



(Tom McCorkle for The Washington Post; food styling by Lisa Cherkasky for The Washington Post)

Kale and Mushroom Lasagna. If you’re bracing for a moody Monday, then let Garfield guide you to a lasagna. Specifically, this vegetable-packed and ultra-cheesy number.



(Tom McCorkle for The Washington Post; food styling by Lisa Cherkasky for The Washington Post)

Cheesy Chicken Enchiladas. This warm dish doesn’t get lost in the sauce, though you just might! Fill with beans instead of chicken to make it vegetarian.



(Photos by Tom McCorkle for The Washington Post; food styling by Bonnie S. Benwick/The Washington Post)

Vegetarian Mapo Tofu. Some of us find solace in super-spicy dishes, so satisfy that craving at home with this totally plant-based mapo tofu.



(Tom McCorkle for The Washington Post; food styling by Lisa Cherkasky for The Washington Post)

Kabocha Squash and Peanut Stew. It’s always gratifying to break down a squash, and even more so to pair it with warming spices in this creamy vegan stew.



(Tom McCorkle for The Washington Post; food styling by Lisa Cherkasky for The Washington Post)

Cinnamon Challah French Toast. Get cozy at breakfast with this gorgeous French toast. You can serve a crowd with these decadent slices that, with their cinnamon sugar top, verge into brulee territory.



(Photos by Tom McCorkle for The Washington Post; food styling by Lisa Cherkasky for The Washington Post)

Triple Hot Chocolate. The best hot drink gets even better with triple the chocolate! Top with marshmallows if desired — or, better yet, turn to our homemade Peppermint Marshmallows.

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2019-10-10 19:01:57

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